Pen Porn, uhm, Sunday?

There’s stuff going on in my life, but maybe more about that later.

I’ve missed the last couple of weeks of Pen Porn Friday — first because I was in LA, then because I was sick (head cold picked up from one of my adorable grand-nieces.)

This week, I bring you cool looking ergonomic pens.



The feather The feather
I love the look of this pen, how it’s flying. It’s supposed to be extremely comfortable as well. More information about it is here.
 Yoropen Yoropen
I nearly bought one of these pens. It is as comfortable to write with as they claim. It’s supposed to be great for both right handed people as well as left handed people. More information about the pen is here.
gel pen gel pen
Here’s what I call a pretty fancy gel pen. More info here.


Comments (6)

  1. Gel pens are my friends. So the Yoropen can be used by lefties? Tempting…my biggest problem now is that my thumb joints have rotated so far, I must try out a pen before buying. I prefer fountain pens, with good paper, so things just glide, but may have to break down and buy a barrel-fill pen — the refill cartridges always seem to leave bubbles in them, meaning even less ink. I usually carry at least two fountain pens, just for that reason. Of course, different pens will accept different paper quality, another nutty challenge of life for we defiant fountain pen people.

    Now, if I could just figure out where my student Lamy “nail” went….

    • According to the website, Yoropen can be used by lefties. I don’t know, I’m not a lefty, but I would see if it works for you. It did work for me.

      I don’t use refil cartridges for my fountain pens, but converters with ink instead. Of course, then you start dealing with the fact that some pens like different types of inks better. . . The black Private Reserve ink that I have is wonderful with my Parker, but my Nakomi vanishing point just blots and leaks ink when I use it. The Nakomi works best with Levenger ink.

      One thing — Mont Blanc ink will work with almost every pen. Why? Because they add the equivalent of dishwashing liquid to their ink. If you have an ink that doesn’t flow, you may want to add the smallest drop of dishwashing liquid to it.

      And yes, I think I’ve officially become a pen geek. *G*

      • Yes, I meant converters — I still can’t get rid of the bubbles sometimes, even submerging the nib completely. I’m glad to know it isn’t my imagination that some pens don’t like some inks. I actually traded one of my fat beauties for its thinner sibling, because W could not get the smaller one to work for him — dried up in moments — where I could not keep the big thing from sputtering. Of course, I use Swisher ink, friend to lefties and their pens, and most of my colors are permanent. A friend lost four manuscript pages to a glass of tea — so important things get permanent ink!

        I did buy W. the classic Parker/Waterford luxury blue my mother used to write in, since he wanted something visibly blue. I told him to try it in the pen that sputtered for me. I bet it will work for him.

        Dish soap? I’ve used it to get ink off my fingers, but haven’t been brave enough to try it in the ink. A friend of mine hates Mont Blanc pens/ink. I wonder if the soap dilutes it too much for her? She loves the angled ink jars, though.

  2. Gel pens are my friends. So the Yoropen can be used by lefties? Tempting…my biggest problem now is that my thumb joints have rotated so far, I must try out a pen before buying. I prefer fountain pens, with good paper, so things just glide, but may have to break down and buy a barrel-fill pen — the refill cartridges always seem to leave bubbles in them, meaning even less ink. I usually carry at least two fountain pens, just for that reason. Of course, different pens will accept different paper quality, another nutty challenge of life for we defiant fountain pen people.

    Now, if I could just figure out where my student Lamy “nail” went….

    • According to the website, Yoropen can be used by lefties. I don’t know, I’m not a lefty, but I would see if it works for you. It did work for me.

      I don’t use refil cartridges for my fountain pens, but converters with ink instead. Of course, then you start dealing with the fact that some pens like different types of inks better. . . The black Private Reserve ink that I have is wonderful with my Parker, but my Nakomi vanishing point just blots and leaks ink when I use it. The Nakomi works best with Levenger ink.

      One thing — Mont Blanc ink will work with almost every pen. Why? Because they add the equivalent of dishwashing liquid to their ink. If you have an ink that doesn’t flow, you may want to add the smallest drop of dishwashing liquid to it.

      And yes, I think I’ve officially become a pen geek. *G*

      • Yes, I meant converters — I still can’t get rid of the bubbles sometimes, even submerging the nib completely. I’m glad to know it isn’t my imagination that some pens don’t like some inks. I actually traded one of my fat beauties for its thinner sibling, because W could not get the smaller one to work for him — dried up in moments — where I could not keep the big thing from sputtering. Of course, I use Swisher ink, friend to lefties and their pens, and most of my colors are permanent. A friend lost four manuscript pages to a glass of tea — so important things get permanent ink!

        I did buy W. the classic Parker/Waterford luxury blue my mother used to write in, since he wanted something visibly blue. I told him to try it in the pen that sputtered for me. I bet it will work for him.

        Dish soap? I’ve used it to get ink off my fingers, but haven’t been brave enough to try it in the ink. A friend of mine hates Mont Blanc pens/ink. I wonder if the soap dilutes it too much for her? She loves the angled ink jars, though.

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